Bycycle Safety Lights

Worth Protection Security
12 Pondview Drive, Litchfield, NH 03052
(603) 674-4159
[email protected]

"Our Products May Not Kill Anyone...
But They'll Sure Mess Up Their Day!"

Secure purchase on stun guns and pepper spraysBicycle Safety Lights are the safe and convenient way to illuminate your bike. These lights are visible at distances up to a mile. Convenient bungee closure attaches to any bike. Long Lasting LED Rated at 100,000 Hours of Use.  Great for hiking and camping. How many times have you gotten up in the middle of the night to walk you wife to the rest room?  While now the Bicycle Safety Light can be mounted on top of  your tent and guide you back. 
Micro Bike Lights have a bungee cord and curved inner surface that allows the lights to be securely attached to your seat post, handlebars or bike frame. Front and Rear Safety Lights, 2 Function: Steady and Flashing, Requires 2 CR2032 Replaceable Lithium batteries (included).
 
$10.95 (set)

Bicycle Headlight includes easy to use handlebar mounting bracket that allows for quick release when not in use. Can also use as a flashlight. Super Bright LED's, 2 Functions: Steady and Flashing, Requires 2 AA batteries (Not Included)

$14.95 each
Bicycle Taillight has 180 degrees of illumination, ensuring you will be seen from both sides, as well as from behind. 5 Super Bright LED's, 2 Functions: Steady and Flashing, Requires 2 AAA batteries (Not Included)
 
$6.99 each
Secure purchase on stun guns and pepper spraysBicycle riding is fun, healthy, and a great way to be independent.
But it is important to remember that a bicycle is not a toy; it?s a vehicle!

Be cool ? follow some basic safety tips when you ride.
 

Safe Riding Tips

Before using your bicycle, make sure it is ready to ride. You should always
inspect your bike to make sure all parts are secure and working properly.

Remember to:

  • Wear a Properly Fitted Bicycle Helmet. Protect your brain, save your life.

     
  • Adjust Your Bicycle to Fit. Stand over your bicycle. There should be 1 to 2 inches between you and the top tube (bar) if using a road bike and 3 to 4 inches if a mountain bicycle. The seat should be level front to back. The seat height should be adjusted to allow a slight bend at the knee when the leg is fully extended. The handlebar height should be at the same level with the seat.

     
  • Check Your Equipment. Before riding, inflate tires properly and check that your brakes work.

     
  • See and Be Seen. Whether daytime, dawn, dusk, foul weather, or at night, you need to be seen by others. Wearing white has not been shown to make you more visible. Rather, always wear neon, fluorescent, or other bright colors when riding day or night. Also wear something that reflects light, such as reflective tape or markings, flashing lights or head and tail lights. Remember, just because you can see a driver doesn?t mean the driver can see you.

     
  • Control Your Bicycle. Always ride with at least one hand on the handlebars. Carry books and other items in a bicycle carrier or backpack.

     
  • Watch for and Avoid Road Hazards. Be on the lookout for hazards such as potholes, broken glass, gravel, puddles, leaves, and dogs. All these hazards can cause a crash. If you are riding with friends and you are in the lead, yell out and point to the hazard to alert the riders behind you.

     
  • Avoid Riding at Night. It is far more dangerous to ride at night than during the day because you are harder for others to see. If you have to ride at night, wear something that makes you more easily seen by others. Make sure you have reflectors on the front and rear of your bicycle (white lights on the front and red rear reflectors are required by law in many States), in addition to reflectors on your tires, so others can see you.

Many bicycle-related crashes resulting in injury or death are associated with the bicyclist?s behavior, including such things as not wearing a bicycle helmet, riding into a street without stopping, turning left or swerving into traffic that is coming from behind, running a stop sign, and riding the wrong way in traffic. To maximize your safety, always wear a helmet AND follow the rules of the road.

Rules of the Road ? Bicycling on the Road    

Bicycles in many States are considered vehicles, and cyclists have the same rights and the same responsibilities to follow the rules of the road as motorists. When riding, always:

  • Go With the Traffic Flow. Ride on the right in the same direction as other vehicles. Go with the flow ? not against it.

     
  • Obey All Traffic Laws. A bicycle is a vehicle and you?re a driver. When you ride in the street, obey all traffic signs, signals, and lane markings.

     
  • Yield to Traffic When Appropriate. Almost always, drivers on a smaller road must yield (wait) for traffic on a major or larger road. If there is no stop sign or traffic signal and you are coming from a smaller roadway (out of a driveway, from a sidewalk, a bike path, etc.), you must slow down and look to see if the way is clear before proceeding. This also means yielding to pedestrians who have already entered a crosswalk.

     
  • Be Predictable. Ride in a straight line, not in and out of cars. Signal your moves to others.

     
  • Stay Alert at All Times. Use your eyes AND ears. Watch out for potholes, cracks, wet leaves, storm grates, railroad tracks, or anything that could make you lose control of your bike. You need your ears to hear traffic and avoid dangerous situations; don?t wear a headset when you ride.

     
  • Look Before Turning. When turning left or right, always look behind you for a break in traffic, then signal before making the turn. Watch for left- or right-turning traffic.

     
  • Watch for Parked Cars. Ride far enough out from the curb to avoid the unexpected from parked cars (like doors opening, or cars pulling out).

Sidewalk versus Street Riding

The safest place for bicycle riding is on the street, where bicycles are expected to follow the same rules of the road as motorists and ride in the same direction.

  • Children less than 10 years old, however, are not mature enough to make the decisions necessary to safely ride in the street.

     
  • Children less than 10 years old are better off riding on the sidewalk.

     
  • For anyone riding on a sidewalk:

     
    • Check the law in your State or jurisdiction to make sure sidewalk riding is allowed.

       
    • Watch for vehicles coming out of or turning into driveways.

       
    • Stop at corners of sidewalks and streets to look for cars and to make sure the drivers see you before crossing.

       
    • Enter a street at a corner and not between parked cars. Alert pedestrians that you are near by saying, ?Excuse me,? or, ?Passing on your left,? or use a bell or horn.

 

Flat Rate $8.95 Shipping and Handling will be added to most orders. (Continental USA orders only) Additional Shipping charges may apply for unusually heavy, expedited delivery, or orders outside Continental USA.

 
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